Probiotics and Prebiotics

Probiotics are friendly bacteria that support your healthy gut. They can be found in your gut and in a variety of foods, as well as in some fermented supplements.

Probiotics maintain the integrity of the gut lining, boost immune function, promote healthy inflammatory responses, improve digestion, help heal inflammatory bowel conditions, manage and prevent skin conditions, fight food-borne illnesses, and improve psychological function.

What are some of the best probiotic-rich foods?

  • Fermented foods: Yoghurt (dairy and non-dairy), Lassi (Indian yoghurt drink), kefir (dairy and non-dairy).
  • Fermented soy: Natto, miso, and tempeh (avoid if soy-allergic or soy-sensitive or soy-intolerant).
  • Veggies: Sauerkraut, pickled vegetables, and kimchi.
  • Tea:  Kombucha.

Prebiotics are carbohydrate-based sources of fiber that are food for the beneficial bacteria in your gut. Prebiotic fibers help your probiotics to grow and thrive. They are helpful in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease and intestinal permeability (“leaky gut”). They also help to regulate bowel function, and form a foundation in your gut so that your probiotics can grow and stabilize.

What are some of the best prebiotic foods?

  • Vegatables: Onions, chicory, garlic, leeks, leafy greens, asparagus, artichokes, and tomatoes (skip the tomatoes if omitting nightshades).
  • Fruits: Berries, bananas, kiwis, cherries, apples, pears, mangos.
  • Grain: Oats (omit if on a gluten-free diet) and quinoa (pressure cooked).
  • Legumes: Lentils, chickpeas, white beans, black beans (pressure cooked).
  • Seeds & Gums: Flaxseed, acacia gum.

In addition to heathy probiotic and prebiotic foods, eating foods that are rich in polyphenols can help to further balance your gut bacteria.

Some of the best polyphenol-rich foods are: Green tea, yellow onion, dark red wine, dark chocolate (must be 72% or higher), cocoa powder, cloves, peppermint, celery seed, black elderberry, cherry, green olive, European chestnut, flaxseed, basil, Mexican oregano, blueberry, plum, pecan, and hazelnut.

Note: If you have an allergy, sensitivity, or an intolerance to any food, avoid it. If you have been advised by a health care practitioner to abstain from any food listed, avoid it. Not sure if a food is okay for you? Contact me to find out more about Vibrant laboratories microchip testing. Mayo Clinic says Vibrant is ushering in a “new era” of laboratory testing. These tests are 97-99% accurate, unlike any other tests in history. Contact me to do the Vibrant Zoomer testing and find out what your triggers are!

Wishing you health & happiness,

Van

FMHC: NB & GCP

I am a certified functional medicine health coach (FMHC), here to help you with wellness coaching, nutritional and lifestyle programs, detoxification protocols, hair testing mineral analysis (HTMA), heavy metals, wheat & gluten disorders and with a variety of physical & autoimmune conditions.

Learn more and contact me through my website: www.vhhealth.com.

For the BEST near infrared sauna, please visit SaunaSpace.com.

Nothing in this post is intended to diagnose, treat or cure any condition. It does not constitute medical advice.

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