This & That: Notes During Covid-19

This & That

1.Do you have NAP syndrome (Dr. Mark Hyman)= “not enough pain” syndrome?   Sometimes,  unless we are in a panic or under severe stress, we don’t make lasting changes in our behavior. Covid is a time to choose new adaptive behaviors, rather than choose new (or old) maladaptive behaviors. So I recommend British physician Dr. Rangan Chatterjee’s new book:  “Feel Better in Five”.  Five minutes to make significant changes! 

2.Studies I heard this week suggest that in quarantine-like situations, 45% of people gain weight and 35% of people lose weight. Covid quarantine is a great time to observe what we are eating…or not eating. Keep a loving posture towards yourself, keep a food journal if it helps, and focus on emotional gratification as something different than oral gratification. What makes you happy?  A movie? Walk? Dance for a few minutes (put on your favorite music for 5 minutes an have yourself a little boogie!),  FaceTime with a friend? Music? Fresh air?

3.Keep on with your nutrition:  

a.hydrate at LEAST an 1/2oz. of water per pound of body weight.  Weigh 160 lbs?  Then you will drink 80 oz of spring water minimum= 10 cups of water per day.  And adjust:  add in  more if exercising, detoxing, having a glass of wine, or dealing with a chronic or acute health condition. Avoid plastic bottles!

b.Eat the rainbow of veggies and limited fruits. Pick local and organic whenever possible.

c.Choose 2 root veggies every day. Your gut bacteria will thank you. 70-80% of immunity is in your gut. 

d.Choose healthy proteins and good fats.

e.Eat a form of fermentation every day:  pickled veggies, yoghurt (I avoid cow dairy so I choose coconut yoghurt), kefir, kimchi, sauerkraut, miso, whatever you like, so you can give a diversity of inoculation to your microbiome. Store bought kombucha is increasingly full of sugar and frequently not fermented long enough to grow robust bacteria, so make yours at home if you can. 

4.Seek out a heart connection.  Have a “heart snack” (Dr. Chatterjee). Find anyone in your day to spend 5 minutes with, put away social media and distraction , connect with someone you love. I work with many “carers”.  If you are caring for kids, parents, others,  find someone for five minutes that you are not taking care of.

5.One of the questions I am asked the most is “what are the good fats to eat”?

I like the list in Dale Bredesen’s new book:” The End of Alzheimer’s Program”.  On p. 117 he says: 

a. olive, avocado, walnut, macadamia, sesame, perilla, algae, MCT, coconut, red palm oils:   cold pressed and organic 

b.avocado, nuts, seeds, coconut, cacao butter, fatty cold water fish, egg yolk (pastured hens)

c.ghee, butter, lard (from pastured animals)

Do not eat a fat to which you believe you have a known sensitivity or reaction.

6.Do you also suffer from FLC syndrome (Dr. Mark Hyman)= “feel like crap” syndrome?  In addition to following the above recommendations, cut out sugar, alcohol, gluten, and dairy for 3 weeks and see if you don’t feel better!  Or contact me for the most accurate allergy and food sensitivity testing in the world (according to Mayo Clinic , Stanford, and many other doctors) to find out.  For example, I’ve found out I cannot touch gluten or cow dairy, ginger or turmeric, so I feel at ease with non-gluten starch like quinoa and goat ghee, goat cheese and other herbs and spices.

Each of us has to make our own “food playpen”, that circumference of foods that are safe and nurturing for our bodies.  Since every person in the USA is now dealing with more than 270 different toxins per day, our bodies tolerance for foods has decreased. Each of us needs to step carefully to reduce the inflammatory response that some foods will trigger.  Without testing, the biggest food groups to which humans react are gluten (wheat, barley, rye, and many additives), dairy, tree nuts, eggs, soy, peanuts, and shellfish/fish. 

Stay safe and well! Happy to report that not one of my nutrition clients world-wide has had Covid-19!  

What Is Pu-erh Tea?

Pu-erh tea originates from the Yunnan province of China. It is named after the town in which it was first developed. Pu-erh tea (pronounced “poo-air”) is post-fermented, which means that the tea leaves go through a microbial fermentation process after they have been dried and rolled, causing the leaves to darken and change in flavor. This process allows the teas to not only improve with age like a fine wine, but many pu-erhs are able to retain their freshness for up to fifty years! Pu-erh teas can be found in compressed brick form or in loose leaf form and can be made from both green and black tea leaves. It is made from ancient trees with mature leaves that are said to be between 500 and 1000 years old. These trees are grown in temperate regions and although they can be harvested year-round, the opportune time to harvest is in mid-spring. Various conditions and environmental factors can impact the flavor profile of pu-erh, resulting in a rich experience for the tea drinker’s palate.

History of Pu-erh Tea
Pu-erh tea can be traced back to the Yunnan Province during the Eastern Han Dynasty (25-220CE). Pu-erh was transported by mules and horses in long caravans along established routes that became known as the Tea Horse Roads. Traders would barter for tea in the markets of Pu-erh County and then hire the caravans to carry the tea back to their respective homes.
The increasing demand for a tea that could be easily transported and did not spoil on long journeys sent suppliers on a frenzy to come up with ways to preserve the tea. It was found that with fermentation of the leaves, the tea not only stayed fresh, but it actually improved with age. People soon discovered that pu-erh also helped with digestion and cancer, provided other nutrients to the diet, and because it was so affordable, it quickly became a popular household amenity. Pu-erh tea was highly prized and it became a powerful tool for bartering amongst traveling merchants.
Pu-erh Tea Today
Today, pu-erh continues to be regarded as a highly prized commodity. Even in modern society, a well preserved pu-erh still maintains its value and remains a household treat. In western society, the popularity of pu-erh tea is only just now being introduced to the mainstream population of tea drinkers. It is only a matter of time before the beauty and benefits of pu-erh tea become commonplace household knowledge. I learned about pu-erh tea through Dr. Steven Gundry in his latest book The Longevity Paradox and I found it to be a refreshing variant to kombucha tea. Your good gut bugs will love it, as it helps to strengthen the gut barrier!
Pu-erh Tea Types and Variants
There are two different ways a pu-erh tea can be classified: raw (sheng) and cooked/ripe (shou). This is due to the amount of processing that occurs after the tea leaves are picked and withered.
With raw processing, the leaves are withered then heaped into piles, much like a compost pile, allowing bacteria to ferment. This is the most important step of the process, called “Wo Dui” (moist track). This is the point where the character of the tea begins to develop. The leaves are then partially pan fired in order to halt enzyme activity, lightly rolled and kneaded, then left to dry in a “Dry Storage” environment with enough moisture to allow the tea to slowly oxidize over time. At this point, the tea is immediately compressed into cakes or left in loose leaf form.
The cooked processing method was developed in the early 1970’s by the Yunnan Kunming tea factory to speed up the process of production. With cooked processing, the tea leaves are picked and withered then mixed with a bacterial culture created to replicate the bacteria that would be created during natural fermentation. Then, the pu-erh is left to fully oxidize for up to 40 days in a hot and humid environment before firing, creating a dark, earthy infusion.
Pu-erh Tea Tips & Preparation
Fill your teapot or tea bowl with about 1 Tbsp tea leaves per 8oz water, and ‘awaken’ them by quickly rinsing with hot water. Immediately flush out the water and re-steep. The best Pu-erh teas can be steeped up to 10-12 times before beginning to lose their flavor. Pu-erh tea is best enjoyed when slurped. This allows for exposure to the air, which will activate the diverse flavors while providing greater contact with your taste buds. Post-fermentation by aging breaks down the caffeine levels in pu-erh, meaning that the caffeine content naturally diminishes the older it gets. This means that a very old pu-erh might have trace amounts of caffeine by the time it is consumed in comparison to a younger pu-erh. That being said, the actual caffeine content present in a cup of pu-erh tea varies upon how long the tea is steeped. The longer the steep time, the more caffeine the tea will contain. Caffeine content will lessen each time tea is re-steeped.
I buy organic Pu-erh tea at my local food coop. You can order some wonderful varieties of Pu-erh tea from the Art of Tea. Please note that I adapted the above information from the Art of Tea website, making modifications for this post. To read more about the benefits of pu-erh tea, Cup & Leaf has a great list of the top 8 benefits. Enjoy!

In good health,

Van
FMHC: NB & GCP

I am a certified functional medicine health coach (FMHC), here to help you with wellness coaching, nutritional and lifestyle programs, Vibrant Labs microchip testing, detoxification protocols, hair tissue mineral analysis (HTMA), heavy metals, wheat & gluten disorders and with a variety of physical & autoimmune conditions.

Learn more and contact me through my website: www.vhhealth.com.

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Nothing in this post is intended to diagnose, treat or cure any condition. It does not constitute medical advice.

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